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Effective use of colors in meteorological visualizations

July 17, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Posters, Resources, Writing  

A new paper has appeared in the Early Online Releases at the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. This paper is entitled,

Scientific integrity matters! Fabricated peer reviewers lead to 60 retractions.

July 11, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Publishing, Reviewing  

Thanks to The Week‘s report, I was alerted to the 60 retracted articles from the Journal of Vibration and Control. The explanation and list of retracted papers is here. More saucy details can be found here. Kudos to the Editor-in-Chief Ali H. Nayfeh and SAGE for carrying out the investigation and retracting the papers. This […]

The importance of communication skills in the National Weather Service

June 20, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri  

As part of an online discussion forum, Wes Browning, Meteorologist in Charge of the National Weather Service Forecast Office in St. Louis, had this to say about the importance of communication skills. …as an NWS hiring official, I’d like to point out the critical importance of communications skills and training in operational emergency management (NIMS). […]

TMA (Too Many Acronyms)

June 19, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

Something’s happening here. Something either has been increasing in frequency recently or has started grating on my nerves more: the tendency of authors to introduce numerous and unnecessary acronyms in their manuscripts. This example comes from George Bryan. Clearly, this one is over the top. “Comparing each composite MLqv to their respective distribution means, FA […]

Chinese translation of “How to Research and Write a Case Study in Meteorology”

June 1, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

Hai-Jiang Kong of the Henan Meteorological Observatory was kind enough to translate my article “How to research and write effective case studies in meteorology” in the Electronic Journal of Severe Storms Meteorology into Chinese: “如何做有效的天气个例研究”. That article is made available here: PDF. Thanks Hai-Jiang! Schultz, D. M., 2010: How to research and write effective case […]

First for Eloquent Science

June 1, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri  

Matt Bunkers has just published a paper in the National Weather Association’s Journal of Operational Meteorology. The acknowledgements read: “The book, Eloquent Science, was an in- dispensable resource during the many revisions of this paper.” This is the first time I am aware of an acknowledgement in a journal article. In an email, Matt told […]

How to give feedback to colleagues and students on their writing

May 12, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri, Reviewing  

One of the perpetual difficulties with providing feedback to others is the tendency to coat the paper in red ink, leaving the author having to plow through all the comments. While not inherently bad in itself (I’m guilty as charged!), it can leave the author thinking that the 30 errors in punctuation exceed the one […]

Advice on providing better feedback…

May 3, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri, Writing  

Our advisors coated the drafts of our writing in red ink. And, we, in turn, coat the drafts of our students’ writing in red ink. Does the volume of red ink challenge students to improve their writing, or do they just shrug it off (for any number of reasons)? I was just reading an article […]

Improving communication skills through writing groups

April 30, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri, Presentations, Writing  

Liveblog (Vienna, Austria): Later today and tomorrow, I’ll be talking to ClimateSnack‘s Mathew Reeve about improving communication skills for scientists. This got me thinking more about what ClimateSnack is trying to do. This graphic shows it well. It is about getting scientists to become better communicators with other scientists through short Climate Snack blog posts. […]

Speaker tips

April 28, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Presentations  

Liveblog (Vienna, Austria): We’re four talks into the European Geosciences Union General Assembly (#EGU2014). Already we have seen how some speakers could improve their presentations. 1. Too many graphs on one slide that are spoken about too quickly, if they are spoken about at all. 2. Font sizes too small to be seen, even when […]

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