Saturday, August 30, 2014

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David Byrne: Inspiration for Good Science Writing

August 15, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri, Writing  

About a month ago, I had finished reading How Music Works by David Byrne (formerly of Talking Heads). I was always a big fan of the music of Talking Heads and Byrne, and I found his movie True Stories quirky. I am a huge musicophile, as well, and when I saw the book on the […]

How the Purpose of the Literature Review Affects How You Write It

July 20, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

Which is harder? Assembling the literature review for your dissertation or assembling the literature review for your journal article? Have you ever struggled with trying to assemble a literature review section? For your dissertation, you might be overwhelmed by the large number of papers in your discipline that you feel that you need to address. […]

Effective use of colors in meteorological visualizations

July 17, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Posters, Resources, Writing  

A new paper has appeared in the Early Online Releases at the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. This paper is entitled,

TMA (Too Many Acronyms)

June 19, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

Something’s happening here. Something either has been increasing in frequency recently or has started grating on my nerves more: the tendency of authors to introduce numerous and unnecessary acronyms in their manuscripts. This example comes from George Bryan. Clearly, this one is over the top. “Comparing each composite MLqv to their respective distribution means, FA […]

Chinese translation of “How to Research and Write a Case Study in Meteorology”

June 1, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

Hai-Jiang Kong of the Henan Meteorological Observatory was kind enough to translate my article “How to research and write effective case studies in meteorology” in the Electronic Journal of Severe Storms Meteorology into Chinese: “如何做有效的天气个例研究”. That article is made available here: PDF. Thanks Hai-Jiang! Schultz, D. M., 2010: How to research and write effective case […]

Advice on providing better feedback…

May 3, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri, Writing  

Our advisors coated the drafts of our writing in red ink. And, we, in turn, coat the drafts of our students’ writing in red ink. Does the volume of red ink challenge students to improve their writing, or do they just shrug it off (for any number of reasons)? I was just reading an article […]

Improving communication skills through writing groups

April 30, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Potpourri, Presentations, Writing  

Liveblog (Vienna, Austria): Later today and tomorrow, I’ll be talking to ClimateSnack‘s Mathew Reeve about improving communication skills for scientists. This got me thinking more about what ClimateSnack is trying to do. This graphic shows it well. It is about getting scientists to become better communicators with other scientists through short Climate Snack blog posts. […]

“Over” versus “more than”

March 22, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

Reader Russ Schumacher pointed out to me that the Associated Press has now accepted both “over” and “more than” as in “over 500 people attended” and “more than 500 people attended”. The outrage from the community is described here. Where do you stand?

My response to 3monththesis’s “Why some perfectionism is a good thing”

March 6, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

The original post is here, and the post starts: One of the most common pieces of writing advice is to “just get words down on the page; don’t worry about detail, and don’t think too much”. This is often given as a way of overcoming writers block, or the “fear of the blank page”. Perfectionism […]

Polarimetric radar terminology

February 27, 2014   Filed under Blog, Featured, Writing  

My colleague Joey Picca from the Upton NWS Forecast Office tells me that the term “dual-polarimetric” is redundant because “polarimetric” already implies the use of a radar with multiple polarizations. Thus, “polarimetric” or “dual-polarization” are more proper. Image from http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~schuur/radar.html

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