Friday, October 20, 2017

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How Bill Paxton Helped Us Understand Tornadoes in Europe

February 26, 2017   Filed under Articles, Blog, Featured, Popular, Potpourri  

Today I learned that Bill Paxton died at the age of 61. I never met him, although I knew people who had met him during the filming of Twister. He was said to be friendly and curious about the science on set. Many meteorologists of a certain age group are likely in this career because […]

New “Eloquent” article now published

May 26, 2011   Filed under Articles, Blog, Featured, News, Writing  

Following up on a previous post, “Occluded fronts and the occlusion process: A fresh look at conventional wisdom” has now been published in BAMS. Download it here.

One of the most challenging (and satisfying) articles I’ve written

December 28, 2010   Filed under Articles, Blog, Featured, News, Writing  

I recently coauthored a paper that has now been accepted for publication in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Schultz, D. M., and G. Vaughan, 2011: Occluded fronts and the occlusion process: A fresh look at conventional wisdom. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 92, doi: 10.1175/2010BAMS3057.1. This paper is the first one I’ve written solely […]

Teaching Scientific Communication Skills – BAMS article

October 30, 2010   Filed under Articles, Blog, Featured, News, Potpourri, Resources  

My experiences teaching a scientific communications laboratory course based on Eloquent Science is described in a recent article published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Schultz, D. M., 2010: A university laboratory course to improve scientific communication skills. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 91, 1259–1266, ES25–34. Download the article here, along with its Electronic […]

Where to publish case studies in meteorology

July 16, 2010   Filed under Articles, Featured, Writing  

Dr. Alexander Keul of Salzburg University asked me whether any journals were publishing case studies in meteorology. What was interesting was that I had received another question or two along these lines recently. Seemed like an opportunity to blog. I would argue that there are two extremes of what one might call “case studies.” On […]

“PowerPoint makes us stupid.”

April 30, 2010   Filed under Articles, Blog, Featured, Presentations  

This story is from The New York Times about how PowerPoint has been used (or banned, in some cases) from military meetings and briefings. “We have met the enemy and he is PowerPoint.”

Eloquent Science won an EXCEL Award

April 27, 2010   Filed under Articles, Blog, Featured, News, Potpourri  

From Sarah Jane Shangraw, AMS Books Managing Editor: Eloquent Science has won an EXCEL award from Association Media & Publishing. Each year the Association, formerly known as the Society of National Association Publishers, bestows EXCEL awards in several categories of media and publication, including two book categories: technical and non-technical. Within each category they award […]

Redundancy in scientific writing

December 7, 2009   Filed under Articles, Blog, Writing  

You may remember an elementary or middle school English teacher urging you to vary the vocabulary in your writing. I have a very strong memory of that from my youth. Such strict lessons from an early age may be difficult to break, but scientific writing does not have to be like prose writing for English […]

What Writing This Book Taught Me

November 16, 2009   Filed under Articles, Blog, Potpourri, Writing  

[DMS: This was going to be a sidebar in the last chapter of Eloquent Science, but we decided upon removing it to shorten the text. Remarkably personal, this text shows the struggles that I had to go through to deliver text I was happy with (or at least satisfied with).] 14 March 2008: Mary Golden […]

American versus British English

November 6, 2009   Filed under Articles, Blog, Resources, Writing  

[DMS: This was a sidebar that I cut from the book.  Even before I met and married my British–Australian wife, I had this sidebar in mind very early in the planning of the book.] Over 300 years of separation has led to discernible differences between English as practiced in the United States and English as […]