Thursday, November 27, 2014

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Eloquent Science: A Practical Guide to Becoming a Better Writer, Speaker, & Atmospheric Scientist was conceived from a workshop taught over six years to undergraduate students at a summer research experience. The volume is divided into three parts: writing, reviewing, and speaking, and offers tips on poster presentations, media communication, and advice for non-native speakers of English, as well as appendices on proper punctuation usage and meteorological concepts. Sidebars written by experts in the field offer diverse viewpoints on reference topics important to the reader, and a recommended reading section at the end of the book guides the reader to the best additional resources. Although the book is aimed at students and early career scientists, even senior scientists will find useful nuggets inside.

 

To order, visit:

The American Meteorological Society (preferred) or

The University of Chicago Press

Also available at Amazon.com

E-Book now available through Springer.

Eloquent Science may be freely available through your library. Visit here to find out.

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